Breathtaking is the only word to describe it
A CRUISE TO ALASKA
Some of the places experienced in Alaska
'Travel is useful, it exercises the imagination. All the rest is dis­appointment and fatigue.'
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Flying over Greenland to get to Alaska
No it is not green, as Iceland is not only ice
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Greenland
Many glaciers in Greenland from the air
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Mendenhall Glacier
This was the first glacier I saw on our Alaska trip and it was just breathtaking!
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Mendenhall Glacier
Mendenhall Glacier is a glacier about 13.6 miles long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska.
Mendenhall Glacier
Mendenhall Glacier is a glacier about 13.6 miles long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska.
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Glacier Bay
Covering 3.3 million acres of rugged mountains, dynamic glaciers, temperate rainforest, wild coastlines and deep sheltered fjords, Glacier Bay National Park is a highlight of Alaska's Inside Passage and part of a 25-million acre World Heritage Site—one of the world's largest international protected areas. From sea to summit, Glacier Bay offers limitless opportunities for adventure and inspiration.
Glacier Bay
From the bottom of the deepest glacial fjord to the summit of its highest peak, Glacier Bay encompasses some of our continent's most amazing scenery and wildness. It is a land reborn, a world returning to life, a living lesson in resilience. If ever we needed a place to intrigue and inspire us, this is it. Glacier Bay is a homeland, a living laboratory, a national park, a designated wilderness, a biosphere reserve, and a world heritage site. It's a marine park, where great adventure awaits by boating into inlets, coves and hideaway harbors. It's also a land park, with its snow-capped mountains, spectacular glaciers, and emerald–green forests. From the summit to sea, Glacier Bay's wildness is remote, dynamic and intact.
Glacier Bay
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Johns Hopkins Glacier
Glacier Bay National Park includes 16 tidewater glaciers:12 actively calve icebergs into the bay. The show can be spectacular. As water undermines the ice fronts, great blocks of ice up to 200 feet high break loose and crash into the water.

The Johns Hopkins Glacier calves such volumes of ice that it is seldom possible to approach its ice cliffs closer than about 2 miles.

The glaciers seen here today are remnants of a general ice advance- the Little Ice Age- that began about 4,000 years ago. This advance in no way approached the extent of continental glaciation during Pleistocene time. The Little Ice Age reached its maximum extent here about 1750, when general melting began.
Johns Hopkins Glacier
Glaciers form because the snowfall in the high mountains exceeds snow-melt. The snowflakes first change to granular snow- round ice grains- but the accumulating weight soon presses it into solid ice. Eventually, gravity sets the ice mass flowing downslope, usually far less than 4 to 7 feet per day. The point at which the rate of melt equals the rate of accumulation is the glacier's terminus or snout.

If the glacier's snout reaches tidal waters, we call it a tidewater glacier.Today's advance or retreat of a glacier snout reflects many factors: snowfall rate, topography, and climate trends. Glacial retreat continues today on the bay's east and southwest sides, but on its west side several glaciers are advancing.
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Eagle safari
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Eagle safari
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Eagle safari
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Coming back, Vancouver